REA Sales Team is GROWING!

We are delighted to announce that effective March 18th, Diane Moreno joined REA as Director of Business Development reporting to Dan Bolger on our Sales and Partnerships team. Diane comes to REA with over 15 years of international sales and marketing experience. Fluent in English, Spanish and Portuguese, she is an accomplished corporate housing and relocation professional with a strong portfolio of successes orchestrating the start-up, growth, and launch of business development activities in global mobility. Her depth of experience extends to commercial retail, distributors, outside vendors, suppliers and kiosk chains in the US and in international markets.

Diane will manage sales activities at REA, and her experience and relationships in the relocation industry will be a tremendous asset to our award-winning global team. Due to her husband’s multiple job assignments, Diane understands from her own experience the challenges of a transferee spouse and family, and she can speak to the excitement and adventure in every relocation. It is her goal to increase the awareness of the spousal support service and educate clients on the impact relocation can have on the entire family. [Read more…]

Lend a Hand. Leave Your Mark. Land a Job.

Once the dust has settled from moving pets and personal belongings into a new home, volunteering may also offer an appealing way to settle into a new community. Lending a hand where it’s needed is a good way to boost self-esteem, demonstrate a strong work ethic and help leave a lasting impression.

Another benefit of voluntarism is that “doing good” can often contribute to “doing well,” long-term. Job interviewers surveyed by Deloitte (Fortune, 2016) observed a connection between unpaid work and finding a job.

In fact:

82% of interviewers stated that they prefer applicants with volunteer experience;

92% say volunteer activities build leadership skills;

The same study noted that, despite the favorability of volunteer work among potential employers, only 32% of job seekers mention unpaid community-service experience on their resumes.

Here are some other benefits of volunteering:

  • Purpose: Volunteering allows individuals and families to immerse themselves into a new community while supporting a meaningful cause and providing a sense of purpose.
  • Flexibility: If schedule management is an issue, the time spent in volunteer work can be as flexible or as structured as needed.
  • Healthy Outlook: Change can be difficult, and boredom can wreak havoc for individuals who are predisposed to depression. Doing something for others is good medicine.
  • Skill Development: Keeping active through volunteering can enhance existing or develop new skills for future career opportunities…or while waiting for visa issues to be resolved.
  • Career Redirection: Volunteering is a creative way to try out a new line of work. When considering a career change, working in a non-profit organization or as an intern in a target company can help to test a new application of skills for long-term career development.
  • Networking: Few networking experiences are better than meeting people through voluntarism. Many corporations encourage their management team to support communities through service. Volunteering alongside professionals who are in a hiring capacity can be quite beneficial to landing a dream job.

As the Chinese proverb says, “A bit of fragrance clings to the hand that gives flowers.” For relocating partners, volunteer work can help support the sweet smell of success.

Check out REA’s Pinterest Board, Volunteer Your Way to A Job, for “best-of-the-web” resources on this topic.

Going Home Again. Six Strategies for Successful Repatriation.

 

Living abroad can be an exciting, transformational experience for a family, as immersing in a new culture exposes family members to a different style of living and often requires relating to one another in new and different ways.

 

Returning “home” though may turn into a disappointment as family members realize that much has changed during their absence: A favorite restaurant has closed, neighbors have moved away, close friends have formed new relationships, new stores have replaced familiar haunts, new neighborhoods have emerged from a cornfield. The result is a home that is somewhat familiar, but not exactly what the memory holds.

 

Further, employees assume that overseas assignments will enhance their career opportunities within their company. While on assignment, they often develop new skills and competencies, but they return home to positions that make no use of their development and growth or, worse yet, find that there really isn’t a plan for the next step on their career path with the company.

 

The Repatriation, returning to one’s home country and settling back into “regular” life — can pose challenges as daunting as those encountered with expatriation, the process of leaving home. Also known as “re-entry shock”, every aspect of life is affected: social, physical, occupational, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual, and change may manifest itself in difficulty adjusting to either home or career—or both– for the employee and family.

 

Recognizing the changes that have occurred for both the individual and the family is key in supporting a successful return to the home country. Based on a wellness model of various aspects of adjustment, here are six strategies to help with repatriation:

 

  1. Stay Social: Encourage families to use social media and Skype to keep in touch with the world that they will be re-entering…AND the one they are leaving. It’s important to continue relationships with family members and friends, even when separated by distance. New technologies make this process much easier than it was a decade ago. Once the family has returned, scheduling time with friends they haven’t seen helps to re-establish bonds.
  2. Be Physical: Changes in diet and activity can alter well-being, for good or ill. If, for example, the family is moving from a location that provides many opportunities for walking to one that is automotive-reliant, building exercise into the schedule helps to fill the void. Establishing new routines that honor recent life changes may be helpful, as well. Yoga or meditation can provide other options for balance.
  3. Acknowledge Change: Helping families to intellectualize the reasons behind the stress they are feeling can help to dissipate some of the dissonances. Encourage them to identify causes of stress, then employ strategies to counteract it.
  4. Find Meaning in Work: Employees who are returning home have developed new skills and perspective. They may need help to identify new challenges and growth opportunities to apply their newfound knowledge, or risk being frustrated and unfulfilled in their work. Relocation and repatriation may affect employment of an accompanying partner, as well. Partners can benefit from assistance in preparing to re-enter the job market.
  5. Honor feelings: Recognize that moving involves a loss, and any loss may be accompanied by a grief cycle. (Denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance.) If relocating individuals find themselves struggling to function through normal activities, working with a counselor or coach who specializes in life transitions may help navigate this process.
  6. Keep the Faith: Many individuals and families are comforted by a spiritual grounding of a faith-based community. If this applies, rejoining or seeking a home in their faith tradition may be a remedy.

 

Thomas Wolfe famously said, “You can’t go home again.” Repatriating families can go home, but they will never be the same as they were before their international experience.  Once conquering the reverse culture-shock phenomenon, families realize how enriched their lives had become as a result of an international assignment.

 

Amy Connelly is the Manager of Training and Corporate Communication for REA – Partners in Transition, a leader in spousal assistance for career transition during relocation. Follow REA’s Pinterest Board on Repatriation, and check out www.reacareers.com to learn more about available services.

Mentors: Their Role in International Relocation

The following article is featured in the July 2015 issue of BR Anchor Publishing’s Monthly News.  Co-authored by BR Anchor’s founder, Beverly Roman, and REA Manager, Mary S. Roberts, it provides insight into using mentoring during international relocation.

International relocation, always a challenge, has an even higher priority now in terms of realizing success for employees, as well as the company’s bottom line. Before employees make a commitment to move abroad, they and their employers need to evaluate the short and long-term career prospects. Employees should have a clear understanding of their overseas assignments, as well as what their jobs will be upon repatriation. Expats also need to stay “tuned in” and connected to their home offices. One of the most effective means to do this is to arrange for expats to have a mentor. This relationship can be mutually beneficial as the mentor stands to gain an overall wider perspective on global organizational needs and activities.

[Read more…]

When the World Is Your Office

When the building consultancy HurleyPalmerFlatt asked Niall Craig to set up an office in Bangalore, his reaction was not “what a great opportunity”. Instead, “the kids will never forgive me” was his first thought about moving his family from Scotland. “Our boys and girl are into local athletics and the sports they really shine at [BMX racing, football and cross-country running] just aren’t big out here,” Mr Craig says. His solution was to become an intercontinental commuter, working six-week stints in India followed by two-week breaks back home in Glasgow.

Expatriation has never been easy on families. To read the full article, click here.