REA Sales Team is GROWING!

We are delighted to announce that effective March 18th, Diane Moreno joined REA as Director of Business Development reporting to Dan Bolger on our Sales and Partnerships team. Diane comes to REA with over 15 years of international sales and marketing experience. Fluent in English, Spanish and Portuguese, she is an accomplished corporate housing and relocation professional with a strong portfolio of successes orchestrating the start-up, growth, and launch of business development activities in global mobility. Her depth of experience extends to commercial retail, distributors, outside vendors, suppliers and kiosk chains in the US and in international markets.

Diane will manage sales activities at REA, and her experience and relationships in the relocation industry will be a tremendous asset to our award-winning global team. Due to her husband’s multiple job assignments, Diane understands from her own experience the challenges of a transferee spouse and family, and she can speak to the excitement and adventure in every relocation. It is her goal to increase the awareness of the spousal support service and educate clients on the impact relocation can have on the entire family. [Read more…]

Need a Brexit Visa?..here’s what you need to know, now!

By Marie Haraburda

On February 19th, REA Coach Jutta Konig participated in a Roundtable discussion sponsored by the Permits Foundation, which is a non-profit organization in The Hague committed to improving work permit regulations for accompanying partners of expatriates around the world. The meeting was hosted by Deloitte at the Brussels airport where Julia Onslow-Cole, Partner, Global Government Strategies and Compliance, discussed the upcoming March 29 European Union (EU) Brexit decision in the United Kingdom (UK) and potential outcomes on immigration policies

Tips for those seeking Visas in the UK

  • With this crucial decision coming, it is recommended that those headed to the United Kingdom do so before the March 29 deadline to avoid potential complications with immigration applications.
  • Those already in the United Kingdom should encourage family members to file for documented immigration status as soon as possible, before the March 29 decision.

[Read more…]

‘Tis the Season!

Tips for making the most of the Job-Search during the Holiday Season.

by Marie Haraburda, Global Career Coach

With December being a festive* month: Should job-seekers take a break from the job search?

It’s a myth that employers stop recruiting in December. Many recruiters have vacancies to fill before the end of the year to avert budget cuts. So while some job seekers lighten up on the search, this opens up more opportunities for those who continue looking. Whether seekers lighten up the search or forge ahead is up to each person. Here are some ways for seekers to include job search activities into their enjoyment of the holidays.

[Read more…]

We’re Moving WHERE?

Job-related relocation can be quite a leap for the ‘accompanying partner’.It’s also the number one reason assignments fail. You won’t believe the price tag.

Imagine coming home from a day at work, starting dinner, throwing a load of towels into the washer, running one kid to soccer practice and dropping another off at ballet, then getting a text from your spouse: “How would you like to move to London?”

Even for those individuals for whom this is a long-awaited adventure, the question might just as well be, “How would you like to completely uproot our lives, sell the house on short notice, pack up all of our worldly belongings, move our kids to a new country where their best friends since nursery school won’t be, where people talk with a different accent, our medical records aren’t easily accessible, they drive on the other side of the road, and we’re a 12-hour, trans-Atlantic plane ride away from our aging parents? Oh, and by the way, you’re going to have to quarantine the dog and quit the job you love.”

Sign me up, right?

[Read more…]

Stressed Out? (Relocating families may be, too!)

Did you know that individuals and families in relocation are more susceptible to illness than those who are not in the midst of major life transitions?

 

It’s all related to stress… distress (those negative events and circumstances that disrupt our lives) and eustress (good things that happen, but still cause disruption). Two psychiatrists, Thomas Holmes and Richard Rahe, identified Life Change Units (LCUs) back in the late ‘60’s, and created the Social Readjustment Rating Scale to help individuals assess their risk of psychosomatic illness based on the stress in their lives. (You can check out the Holmes-Rahe Stress Inventory HERE.) The theory goes that individuals who acquire 150 to 300 points have a 50% higher risk of a major health breakdown over the subsequent two years; those who acquire 300 points or more are 80% more likely to encounter major health concerns.

 

To illustrate, consider how people who are changing jobs and moving can rack up LCUs points (in parentheses) quickly:

  • Major business readjustment (39)
  • Major change in financial state (38)
  • Taking on a mortgage (31)
  • Major change in responsibilities at work (29)
  • Outstanding personal achievement (28)
  • Spouse beginning or ceasing work outside the home (26)
  • Major change in living condition (25)
  • Major changes in working hours or conditions (20)
  • Changes in residence (20)
  • Changing to a new school (20)
  • Major change in church/social/recreational activities (19-20 pts. each)

 

If you add in a Split-Family Relocation which causes a marital separation from partner (65) and subsequent reconciliation (45), a relocating employee can quickly add up well over 300 points in a short period of time. (And that doesn’t even count all the “normal” stressors associated with daily living, such as holidays (12) and a change in sleeping habits (16).)

 

Relocation professionals who work with families in transition can be advocates by recognizing and supporting stressors and encouraging the families they support to engage in activities that support wellness.

 

The National Wellness Institute, founded in 1977, identifies six components of wellness:

 

Helping clients acclimate to a new community and facilitating opportunities for transferees and their families to meet peers contributes to Social Wellness.

 

Physical Wellness, becoming physically fit and consuming nutritious food, can be supported by helping to identify healthy food sources, locating fitness facilities and encouraging family time for physical activity.

 

Intellectual Wellness includes engaging in creative, stimulating mental activity.  Relocated employees immerse themselves in new work activities, but accompanying partners appreciate help in identifying meaningful pursuits, particularly after the logistics of the move are settled.

 

Everyone needs a sense of purpose, and Occupational Wellness refers to personal satisfaction and enrichment in one’s life through work.  Spouses who have left careers behind may need support exploring employment options in a new location.

 

Emotional Wellness is the degree to which an individual feels positive and enthusiastic about his or her life.  Encouraging employees and their families to examine how they feel about the changes that have occurred due to their move helps them to accept these changes and make forward-looking plans.

 

Spiritual Wellness relates to an individual’s search for meaning and purpose.  Living in a way that is consistent with closely-held values promotes growth in this area.

 

Recognizing common stressors of families in transition, as well as the components of wellness can support relocating families to achieve to successful transitions.

 

Amy Connelly (aconnelly@reacareers.com) is REA’s Manager of Training and Resource Development.

When Your Valentine is Far Away

Long-distance relationships pre-date Ulysses and Penelope, Homer’s heroic couple who endured a 20-year separation during and following the Trojan War. The 21st Century incarnation includes updated descriptors, such as “deployment,” most frequently associated with military separations; “Split-Family Relocation,” a term that has entered the lexicon of the relocation industry in recent years; and “LDR,” the online moniker for this decidedly offline concept.

Both the challenges of long-distance love and the principles of strengthening relationships have remained constant through the ages. While the suitors and Sirens that Ulysses and Penelope battled possessed mythical characteristics, the challenges Homer chronicled parallel those that modern couples face: prolonged separation, concern for the other’s safety, tests of fidelity, struggles to manage resources, and lack of companionship. [Read more…]

Let it Snow! Job-Search strategies for the Holidays.

We get it.  Maybe there’s inclement weather.  There are added to-do’s on the list. There’s the entertaining, the re-prioritizing.  Doesn’t seem like the ideal set-up for moving a job-search forward.  Or does it?

REA’s coaching team recently gathered to discuss the subject of your holiday job-search and here’s how we see it:

Yes, you can.  If you want to.

 

IF you want to KEEP THE MOMENTUM GOING:

  • There’s a PERCEPTION that this is a “slow season,”… but it really isn’t. HR managers and recruiters are typically working very hard this time of year to fill vacancies and to use their annual budgets to avoid cuts in the coming year.
  • Since there is that perception, there are often fewer candidates, and that can translate into less competition for some great opportunities.
  • People seem to be in a better mood during the holidays. As such, hiring managers (and others who have their ear) may be more apt to be helpful. They may also have more downtime, particularly as vacation time stalls group productivity, so it’s a good time to set up meetings.

IF you prefer to TAKE A BREAK:

This is a perfect time for planning! Finalizing a resume, updating a LinkedIn profile, developing a marketing plan, and gathering other tools (BTW…holiday specials on business and greeting cards are prevalent), are all worthwhile activities.

  • There are myriad opportunities to volunteer this time of year, too. Giving back enhances sense of purpose, and we know the value of developing new skill sets and extending networks, right?
  • Clear the cobwebs! Take care of issues that may be preventing progress in the search.  It’s a good time for rejuvenation, family time, and life organization.
  • Get to know your new community! For all the reasons it’s a good time to job hunt, it’s also a great time to immerse into your new hometown and build new networks.

Whatever road you choose…The holiday gift that everyone can enjoy is enhanced networking opportunities!  Remember to track your contacts and to follow-up appropriately!  (Greeting cards are an obvious option to share seasonal outreach and update existing networks about life changes.)

Here are links to relevant articles around the web, shared by our coaching team:

Happy hunting!  (Or not…)

Lend a Hand. Leave Your Mark. Land a Job.

Once the dust has settled from moving pets and personal belongings into a new home, volunteering may also offer an appealing way to settle into a new community. Lending a hand where it’s needed is a good way to boost self-esteem, demonstrate a strong work ethic and help leave a lasting impression.

Another benefit of voluntarism is that “doing good” can often contribute to “doing well,” long-term. Job interviewers surveyed by Deloitte (Fortune, 2016) observed a connection between unpaid work and finding a job.

In fact:

82% of interviewers stated that they prefer applicants with volunteer experience;

92% say volunteer activities build leadership skills;

The same study noted that, despite the favorability of volunteer work among potential employers, only 32% of job seekers mention unpaid community-service experience on their resumes.

Here are some other benefits of volunteering:

  • Purpose: Volunteering allows individuals and families to immerse themselves into a new community while supporting a meaningful cause and providing a sense of purpose.
  • Flexibility: If schedule management is an issue, the time spent in volunteer work can be as flexible or as structured as needed.
  • Healthy Outlook: Change can be difficult, and boredom can wreak havoc for individuals who are predisposed to depression. Doing something for others is good medicine.
  • Skill Development: Keeping active through volunteering can enhance existing or develop new skills for future career opportunities…or while waiting for visa issues to be resolved.
  • Career Redirection: Volunteering is a creative way to try out a new line of work. When considering a career change, working in a non-profit organization or as an intern in a target company can help to test a new application of skills for long-term career development.
  • Networking: Few networking experiences are better than meeting people through voluntarism. Many corporations encourage their management team to support communities through service. Volunteering alongside professionals who are in a hiring capacity can be quite beneficial to landing a dream job.

As the Chinese proverb says, “A bit of fragrance clings to the hand that gives flowers.” For relocating partners, volunteer work can help support the sweet smell of success.

Check out REA’s Pinterest Board, Volunteer Your Way to A Job, for “best-of-the-web” resources on this topic.

Who’s on First?

Most people rarely think about career development professionals until they’re pursuing a job search.  And, the choices can be confusing.  If this is where you find yourself, here is an overview of the types of career development professionals you may look to during career transition and which ones will be the best fit for you:

[Read more…]

REA Celebrates a PLATINUM Win and SILVER Innovation Award!

(Basking Ridge, NJ) Sept. 26, 2017 — Cartus awards REA-Partners in Transition with its Platinum Commitment to Excellence Award at the 2017 Global Network Conference in Chicago.

REA-Partners in Transition won its 11th consecutive Platinum Award for outstanding performance, at the Cartus Global Network Conference held on September 25-26 during its annual gala celebration at the Chicago Hyatt McCormick Place. The Cartus Global Network is Cartus’ industry-leading worldwide service provider alliance. Each year, Cartus recognizes the companies and individuals in the Network who have provided extraordinary service to its customers and clients worldwide. The theme of this year’s conference was “Innovate: Collaborate, Excel, Grow Together.

[Read more…]